Poorest Customer Service in the Land Where it Really Counts

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    Banking customer service start off on the phone with a dirge of automatic services to frustrate you long enough to want to hang up and start all over again, this time with a live person asking the same questions.

    No, it’s not a Fairy Tale. It’s more like a rave about bad customer service, why they don’t give good customer service, and naturally, why we should, which gets us to the training part of this. I guess I should feel lucky to not live in a third-world county, but I think I’d get a straight answer there.

    Ever notice, aside from Fast Food Joints (except Chik-Fila), the worst customer service folks seem to work for doctors, those very people who should be caring about how we are when we walk in the door, stupidly or not, thinking this is a place to get immediate medical help. Do it by phone, it’s even worse. If it’s an emergency call, 911. Really?

    My emergency has a to do with a question that has to do with your “doctor” speciality. Granted some specialists are great. Those that deal with Cancer victims, “we jump for them” but still make them fill out the forms and aren’t terribly concerned (unless they ask) if they are able, so weak and trembling the daily treatment we are giving them, but hey, we do remember their names seeing them every day. Nice touch but not enough.

    It seems the lower on the specialty scale the customers can even degrade to rudeness and then when the following Monday someone from the actual office calls you back and chews you out for giving the step-in who did call you for not giving the right number. You were told once before or it might be in multitudes of handouts after the multitudes of legal forms you filled out to make sure you will pay your bill even if insurance won’t. Business chewing client out. If I die because I didn’t, I’m sure there is a paper for that.

    Besides banks, it appears doctor’s offices rank right up there with the only business who insurance companies can insist on you working with, depending on how much money you have. You want the best, pay for it. Bet they have good customer service.

    Banking customer service start off on the phone with a dirge of automatic services to frustrate you long enough to want to hang up and start all over again, this time with a live person asking the same questions. My wife and I found unwarranted charges.

    We spent nothing on the 5th of Whatever; my wife was getting Cancer Treatment all day. We never buy these product lines that showed on our statement. Clearly, not just flag raisers but flag wavers. Some one should have called us before our checking and Debit account was totally wiped out.

    Meanwhile it is up to us to use the no-so-friendly tools listed on their so-so friendly website to find help and assurance this won’t happen again. You see if we had been smart and spent a lot of time looking at every inch of their website it wouldn’t have happened in the first place. Of course, we don’t know any banks or financial institutions that needed bailing out. Now I need bailing out.

    My other credit cards should hold out long enough to make co-pays, but not the three kids in school, mortgage, gas, etc. Who cares.

    Me: 1, Gov 0.

    Training should be part of the bail-out program. Insurance should pay for customer service training. After all, they make life and death decisions for all of us. Customer Service Training should be an easy one; and the trainers should have lots of customers.

    For more resources about training, see the Training library.