16 Ways to Derail Your Attempt at Building a Performance Culture

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    Previous posts have provided tips on overcoming the myth of the paper trail. In an effort to examine this issue from a different angle, below is a list of things that can derail your attempt to create a performance culture.

    1. Save all your feedback on an employee’s performance until the annual review meeting.
    2. Rate an employee higher than they deserve so that they get a bigger raise. (Future post coming on the topic of linking pay to performance).
    3. Rate an employee higher than they deserve because you don’t like negative conversations or because you don’t want the employee to feel bad.
    4. Make the feedback about you.
    5. Only provide negative feedback.
    6. Fail to acknowledge improvements in performance or positive steps toward a goal.
    7. Fail to acknowledge team members who consistently meet expectations.
    8. Providing only one way feedback.
    9. Failing to address issues as they arise. Silence is acceptance.
    10. Allowing bullying or disrespectful behavior or exhibiting it yourself.
    11. Blaming corporate or HR when you provide negative or developmental feedback or consequences.
    12. Failing to explain the business reasons for decisions.
    13. Failing to explain how individual performance helps attain overall objectives.
    14. Failing to develop high potential employees.
    15. Failing to identify high potential employees.
    16. Failing to remain objective even with subjective measures.

    What else would you add to the list? Your ideas are always encouraged!

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    Sheri Mazurek is a training and human resource professional with over 16 years of management experience, and is skilled in all areas of employee management and human resource functions, with a specialty in learning and development. She is currently employed as the Human Resource Manager at EmployeeScreenIQ, a global leader in pre-employment background screening.