Job Satisfaction: Is it Time to Stay or Leave?

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    Have you lost that “loving” feeling?

    You’ve survived the layoffs, cut wages, reorganizations and other company changes. You‘re stressed out, fed up and ready to bolt.

    On the other hand, the economy is going nowhere, the analysts aren’t sure if we’re in recovery, recession or something in-between and you’re being told “you have a job, be happy.”

    So, should you stay or leave? Before you make that critical career decision, take a deep breath, assess your situation and do a cost benefit analysis.

    First, consider the reasons to stay. For example:

    1. Relationships matter more than money.
    You may think you can find a job that will pay you more, but you will be leaving behind a wealth of relationships. When weighing your options, don’t forget the value of the network, the friends and professional colleagues you have now.

    2. You are doing well compared to your peers.
    Research shows that many people under estimate their skills and their prospects and over estimate others. Take the time to do a realistic assessment of what you have to offer and its value in today’s marketplace.

    3. The grass is not always greener.
    People, who are desperate to get out of a job, tend to see potential opportunities only outside their company. They enthusiastically take a new job and then realize they’ve gone from the preverbal frying pan into the fire.

    Now, consider the reasons to leave. For example:

    1. Your relationship with your boss is damaged beyond repair.
    You have tried to mend it but you’re getting stonewalled. Yes, she may be a jerk but she is the boss and in a power struggle, you will probably lose.

    2. Your values are at odds with the culture.
    For example, your company is hierarchical and you want more influence over your job. It’s very hard for one person to change a culture unless he’s the CEO or has been brought in to change things.

    3. Your stress level is way off the charts.
    It’s affecting your physical or mental health and your relationships with family and friends. You’re burnt out, burnt up and dread going to work.

    So what will it be – stay or leave?

    In looking at the reasons to stay and the reasons to leave, which will have the best impact on your personal and career satisfaction? What will provide you with the most benefit today? What about tomorrow?

    Do you want to develop Career Smarts?